Boules & Other Equipment

BOULES AND OTHER EQUIPMENT.

We recommend you contact Christopher Przygoda on 0400 149 848, cprz@bigpond.com or go to the Boules Australia website (www.boulesaustralia.com.au) to purchase any equipment. We suggest you measure your boule throwing hand first. The hand is measured from the top of the middle finger, on the inside of the palm, down to the first line on the wrist.

On average the length is around 18cm which is a 72-73mm diameter boule. If uncertain of the size, it is better to choose a size smaller than a larger boule, as a smaller boule is usually easier to play with than a larger size.

For players in the hand length range 16-20cm the boule weight would be 670-700g, as lighter boules still perform, and again, are easier to use. We strongly recommend trying other people’s boules for the different sizes and weights as this will help guide you towards finding the right size ones for yourself.

Importantly, what will you be using the boules for? If you’re going to play like 85-90% of most pétanque players you’ll probably spend the bulk of your time ‘pointing’ – an experienced player can explain this. If so buying expensive boules may be ‘worth it’ down the track, but for now good quality and reasonably priced boules are a place to start. There are mainly two different types of boules – Carbon and Stainless Steel. (Also Bronze but it isn’t as popular as the other two.)

Carbon boules require some maintenance, stainless steel boules don’t, but they are also more expensive. When we say ‘maintenance’, all that is required with carbon boules is taking them out of the bag once you’re home; a very, very, light coating of oil or vaseline, applied with a microfibre cloth if the weather is humid; and don’t leave them in your car, in their bag, when you’re not using them, as they may rust in that environment.

Here are four examples – two carbon and two stainless steel – priced from the cheapest to about the middle of the range (once you get an understanding of what style of player you want to be, there are more alternatives to look at). Below is a guide to prices:

–     Obut ‘Match’ (carbon): Although the cheapest, it is still a very good boule.      $110.00 + delivery.

–    Obut ‘Match+’ (carbon): A popular boule on the French professional circuit, and in Australia.  $225.00 + delivery.

–      Obut ‘Match 115 IT’ (stainless steel): A good quality, all-round boule for pointers or shooters. $185.00 + delivery.

–     La Boule Bleue ‘Inox 115’ (stainless steel): A good quality, all-round boule for pointers or shooters. $205.00 + delivery.

Additionally it is suggested you purchase a scorer and a tape measure.